Douglass, F. (1882). The life and times of Frederick Douglass From 1817-1882. Christian Age Office.

Douglass, F. (1882). The life and times of Frederick Douglass: From 1817-1882. Christian Age Office.

The source gives a detailed analysis and account of the life of Fredrick Douglass, from his early life as a slave, to how he rose as an abolitionist fighting against slave trade and the eradication of what they thought was a barbaric act. IT also illustrates the battles Frederick Douglass had to champion against even after the abolition of slave trade. It was important to get the pertinent issues affecting the society at that time and to also give the people hope and optimism that better situations were ahead. Only if, they were bold enough to correct the system whenever they felt and knew they were not headed in the right direction.

Martin Jr, W. E. (2000). The Mind of Frederick Douglass. Univ of North Carolina Press.

The book is a short book, but has an incredible and a powerful message. Fredrick Douglass faces horrifying oppressions and he managed to conquer and emerged stronger than he thought. Slavery and hardship did not make him lose sight of the great prize that he clearly understood could come with freedom. He lived an extraordinary life as a slave and as a former slave. He yearned for literacy as he understood that to save himself from bondage he had to be literate. The article demonstrates Fredrick Douglass as a brilliant and an intelligent freedom fighter. His life and mind in particular play significant roles in American history.

Preston, D. J. (2018). Young Frederick Douglass. JHU Press.

Young Fredrick Douglass was a determined individual. He knew slavery was not right and hence understood no individual was bound to go through hard labor and frustrations. The article indicates that young Fredrick Douglas had the zeal to promote the freedom of all the slaves as well as their safety. He had monitored the ways their masters enslaved them and he was sure he was going to use those strategies against them. He promised himself to lead a positive life full of hope and optimism and one that had courage and stirred himself to the right direction which was leading a life that was going to contribute to freedom. Self-improvement and self-help is key as young Fredrick Douglass applied the principle in his life to help he get the insight and the knowledge he was going to use to save the people from slavery.

References.

Douglass, F. (1882). The life and times of Frederick Douglass: From 1817-1882. Christian Age Office.

Martin Jr, W. E. (2000). The Mind of Frederick Douglass. Univ of North Carolina Press.

Preston, D. J. (2018). Young Frederick Douglass. JHU Press.