Differentiated Assessment

Differentiated Assessment

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Differentiated Assessment

The Common Core State Standards require that students should be facilitated to engage in an effective range of collaborative discussions. CCSS lays emphasis on the importance of speaking and listening skills among the students (Puckett, 2013). The learners must be empowered with an opportunity to share their knowledge and be able to gather more knowledge thanks to their effective listening skills. It is a huge challenge to facilitate a real time class conversation as this includes a majority of students and all of them may want to speak at the same time. Learners can boost their confidence in listening and speaking during times when the class is in session by engaging in online discussion forums to give them enough time to process the information, come up with a thoughtful response, and interact with their peers.

With the knowledge of the fact that I take my class through English Language in mind, it is appropriate that I ensure that my students acquire effective listening and speaking skills. During the class, I have to correct any grammatical errors that the learners might have made while speaking to the rest of the class. The corrections should be made in a manner that will not discourage them from voicing their contributions when I ask them questions. I have an obligation of encouraging my students not to be shy to speak up when they have something relevant to say. The students who are always silent in class should not be left just because they don’t have the guts to rise up their hands to contribute. When the weak students get a chance to say something, I will discourage them from engaging in inappropriate verbal cues such as fidgeting and speaking in low voices that cannot be heard by everyone in class. This will progressively help the whole class acquire good listening and speaking skills that will help them during the class, other classes, and in their future.

The students will master the literacy devices used in literature by reading literature materials, performing tribal dances, and listening to music with 90% accuracy. I will measure the mastery of the concepts taught during class using a follow up test. The test will be done a day after I finish teaching the concepts when their minds are still fresh with the previous class’ knowledge. I will also ask random questions during class to gauge the students who have the most understanding of the concept, and if the concept was generally understood by a majority of the learners. I will also ask the students to write in about a hundred words the most important information they acquired from the class.

The students will engage in analysis activities to demonstrate the skills they acquired from the class (Spencer, 2013). I will provide them with various literature materials that I have already reviewed for them to analyze. They will need to go through them keenly to map out the various literary devices the authors used to make their works a success. I will give them questions to discuss in groups of five and then two of them will present their findings in front of the whole class. This will help them build on their listening and speaking kills while expanding their knowledge of literacy devices used in literature.

I will also need to measure their mastery on this topic both as individuals and as the groups I had divided them into earlier. I will give them individual projects identify their favorite pieces of literature and present them to me. After the presentation I will find out if these pieces portray a good amount of literary devices from which the students can learn. Their work will then be to identify them and explain how they enhance plot development in stories, rhythm in poetry, among others. They will submit their findings and then meet as a group to discuss their thoughts with their group members. They will then submit another paper that harmonizes all these literary devices that they have identified.

The students should by the end of the lessons have acquired adequate proficiency levels in the mastery of the concepts. They should be able to get at least 60% in the test that I will set about the concept. The group discussions should flow without the students relying on me all the time for clarification, additions or subtractions. When it’s time for the presentations, the presenters should not act like they do not know what they are talking about for instance by hesitating and confirming with their group members all the time. They should have credible points. The projects must be presented with adequate content information about the current topic and its real life application.

I will need to employ formative assessments during the three days that I will be teaching this topic. On the first day, I will use questioning (Engelhard & Starkman, 2003). If I ask relevant questions then I will provide my students with an opportunity to think deeply. I will also be able to know the significant insight and the depth and degree of understanding of my students through questioning. These questions will involve the learners in a dialogue in the class that will expand their learning. The questions that I will ask will not be limited to the typical factual questions that will need my students to recall numbers and facts.

The assessment will address multiple intelligences as it will assess my students’ ability to answer questions fluently and audibly, their ability to relate previous experiences with the current ones, and their ability to recall concepts they learnt or just came across somewhere. Students who learn better by participating in class activities and those who are better off observing will all benefit from this method of learning. I will use the information I gather from questioning them to determine which areas that need more emphasis and which ones will just need me to scratch the surface.

I will employ observation to get to know more about my students so that I can be in a better position to help them. Observation will enable me establish what my students do not know and what they already know. I will then write these information down using anecdotal notes, anecdotal notebooks, anecdotal note cards, and labels or sticky notes. I will use the information I gather from observing them to adjust the learning instructions to meet the student needs especially those with different learning styles. I will determine which areas need more emphasis and which ones will just need me to brush over. Observation will help me address multiple intelligences more effectively. I will manage to observe all my students and understand them on a more personal level.

On day three I will use discussions. These classroom discussions will help me understand how my students comprehend the basic concepts that I have taught in class. I will provide my students with open ended questions to initiate the discussions. My objective shall be to build knowledge and develop creative and critical thinking skills. The students will increase their depth and breadth of understanding and discard erroneous information. I will be able to assess the students by listening to their responses during our discussions. The assessment will address multiple intelligences as it will assess my students’ ability to answer questions fluently and audibly, their ability to relate previous experiences with the current ones, and their ability to recall concepts they learnt or just came across somewhere. Discussions will help me address multiple intelligences more effectively. I will manage to listen to the responses of all my students and understand them on a more personal level.

For the summative assessments I will use the end of term and unit tests. These tests will address both the multiple intelligences and different learning styles.

The grading rubric:

CATEGORY 4 3 2 1

Identifies facts Student accurately locates at least 5 facts in the article and gives a clear explanation of why these are facts, rather than opinions. Student accurately locates 4 facts in the article and gives a reasonable explanation of why they are facts, rather than opinions. Student accurately locates 4 facts in the article. Explanation is weak. Student has difficulty locating facts in an article.

Identifies important information Student lists all the main points of the article without having the article in front of him/her. The student lists all the main points, but uses the article for reference. The student lists all but one of the main points, using the article for reference. S/he does not highlight any unimportant points. The student cannot important information with accuracy.

Relates Graphics to Text Student accurately explains how each graphic/diagram is related to the text, and accurately determines whether each graphic/diagram agrees with the information in the text. Student accurately explains how each graphic/diagram is related to the text. Student accurately explains how some of the diagrams are related to the text. Student has difficulty relating graphics and diagrams to the text.

Summarization Student uses only 1-3 sentences to describe clearly what the article is about. Student uses several sentences to accurately describe what the article is about. Student summarizes most of the article accurately, but has some slight misunderstanding. Student has great difficulty summarizing the article.

Identifies opinions Student accurately locates at least 5 opinions in the article and gives a clear explanation of why these are opinions, rather than facts. Student accurately locates at least 4 opinions in the article and gives a reasonable explanation of why these are opinions, rather than facts. Student accurately locates at least 4 opinions in the article. Explanation is weak. Student has difficulty locating opinions in an article.

References

Puckett, K (2013). Differentiating Instruction: A Practical Guide. Bridgepoint Education: San Diego, CA.

Engelhard Jr, G., & Starkman, S. (2003). The Role of Formative Evaluation in Externally Mandated Program Reviews in Higher Education.Jill Spencer, (2013); Ten differentiation Strategies for building Common Core Literacy. Retrieved from:http://www.middleweb.com/9866/differentiating-the-common-core/ on September 29, 2014.